AHSAA News

rss

AHSAA News


AHSAA Summer Conference and All-Star Sports Week Kicks Off Tuesday

   MONTGOMERY – AHSAA member school coaches and administrators will gather this week at the Montgomery Renaissance Hotel and Convention Center beginning Tuesday for the 19th annual Alabama High School Athletic Association (AHSAA) Summer Conference and All-Star Sports competition.
    Alabama High School Athletic Directors & Coaches Association (AHSADCA) Director Alvin Briggs said he is pleased with the line-up of speakers scheduled this week.
     “We think we have an outstanding list of clinicians who are very knowledgeable of the best practices in their sports concerning topics ranging from offensive and defensive schemes to current health and safety issues,” Briggs said.
    Among the speakers set to address basketball coaches are Auburn University’s Bruce Pearl and the University of Alabama’s Avery Johnson. Both will be speaking Wednesday.  While NCAA rules currently prevent Division I coaches from speaking at the Coaches’ School, some of the top small-college coaches in the Southeast are scheduled including Tuskegee University’s Willie Slater, Max Thurmond of West Alabama, Joel Williams of Delta State, Charlie Boren of Faulkner University,  and Eddie Garfinkle of Birmingham-Southern, among others.
     Sports to be addressed also include baseball, softball, soccer, volleyball, wrestling, track and field, and cheerleading.  AHSAA Executive Director Steve Savarese will address principals and athletic directors on Friday. Dr. James Robinson and Dr. Lawrence Lemak will also address health and safety issues with the same group Friday.
     The week concludes Friday with two banquets, the AHSAA Sportsmanship Luncheon at noon and the AHSAA Championship Coaches banquet Friday night. The AHSAA Officials Awards banquet will be Saturday morning. All will be at the Renaissance.
       ALL-STAR GAMES BEGIN TUESDAY: The North-South Baseball All-Star doubleheader will be played at 4 p.m. Tuesday at Riverwalk Stadium.   The Soccer North-South Girls’ All-Star match will be played at Emory Folmar Stadium at the AUM YMCA complex at 5 p.m.  The boys will play at 7.
   And the North-South softball competition will play two games at Lagoon Park with first pitch set for 6 p.m.
   The North-South girls’ and boys’ basketball games will be Wednesday night at Alabama State University’s Oliver-Dunn Acadome at 6 and 8 p.m., and the North-South volleyball competition will be Thursday afternoon at 4 p.m. at Cramton Bowl Metroplex. Teams reported Monday and the AHSADCA hosted its annual golf tournament Monday at Lagoon Golf Course.
   AHSAA MOBILE APP: All all-star competition will be webcast live over the NFHS TV Network. Links and instructions on how to subscribe can be found at www.ahsaa.com. The week’s festivities can also be found on the new AHSAA Mobile App, which can be downloaded free at  Apple and Google stores online.


NFHS Network Recognizes Florence High School Among Top Student Broadcast Teams from Across the Country at Inaugural Broadcast Academy

Florence School Broadcast Program Voted Best Live Sports Broadcast for NFHS Network in 2014-15

 

Atlanta Hawks’ CEO Steve Koonin, ESPN and ABC’s Brad Nessler,

ESPN Studio Anchor Chris Cotter Shared Their Success Stories

 

Florence High School’s NFHS School Broadcast Program was recognized last weekend at the first NFHS Network Broadcast Academy for its excellence in broadcasting. Directed by Randy Bruce, a faculty member and coach at Florence, the student-run live-streaming broadcast network was named NFHS Network’s Best Live Sports Broadcast for the 2014-15 school year.

 Florence beat SBP programs from across the nation for the honor.

“We are very proud of our students,” Bruce said. “They have really embraced the school broadcast program at Florence and have worked hard to create their own identity. Our community has embraced their efforts, and their passion, enthusiasm and quality of work is something we are very proud of.   This is indeed a big honor.”


Bruce will present a brief summary of Florence High School’s successes at this week’s AHSAA Summer Conference. He is scheduled to address administrators on Friday at the Montgomery Renaissance Hotel and Conference Center.

The NFHS Network, the nation’s leading high school sports media company, hosted the inaugural NFHS Network Broadcast Academy this past weekend in Atlanta. The unique, interactive event included talks from successful sports broadcasters and media executives, hands-on broadcast training workshops and the first annual NFHS Network Broadcast Academy Awards. The awards ceremony was streamed live at www.nfhsnetwork.com and included behind-the-scenes updates on social platforms including Twitter and Snapchat from attendees using #BA2015. 

 

On Friday, July 17, the participants attended the Atlanta Braves vs. Chicago Cubs game at Turner Field and were treated to an exclusive VIP behind-the-scenes tour.  In a workshop setting on Saturday, July 18, the student broadcasters and teachers participated in producing a live sporting event, broadcasting a live studio show and creating an original feature package about the event. 

 

The sizzle video featuring highlights of the event is available to view online at: http://www.nfhsnetwork.com/events/nfhs/90ca579aa4.

 

The students also heard stories of success, first-hand accounts of life in the sports media industry and career advice from ESPN Studio Anchor Chris Cotter on A Day in the Life of a SportsCenter Anchor, Atlanta Hawks CEO Steve Koonin about The Evolution of Sports & Media, and ESPN and ABC Broadcaster Brad Nessler, who spoke to the students about his Journey as a Broadcaster.

 

Each speaker shared their experiences in the media industry as well as advice for the young students who dream of being in their shoes one day.  Steve Koonin told the students, “Be willing to take a risk, be bold.  You are going to make mistakes. You have to accept that failure is part of success.”  Koonin also emphasized, “Have a unique voice. If you are a stereotype in this business, you are not going to have long-term success.”

 

Echoing Koonin, Brad Nessler recommended, “Take a shot at every opportunity.  You’re never going to learn if you don’t take a shot.”

 

The high point of the event was the first annual NFHS Network Broadcast Awards Ceremony, hosted by NFHS Network’s Rashan Ali.  High school broadcast teams and students were recognized in seven different categories and the 2015 winners are listed below:

 

 Best Overall School Broadcast Program

 Cleveland High School, TN

 

Best New School Broadcast Program

El Capitan High School, Merced, CA

 

Teacher of the Year

Omar Delgado, Christopher Columbus High School, Miami, FL

 

Best Live Sports Broadcast

Florence High School, Florence, AL

 

Best Original Programming

Morning Show, Christopher Columbus High School, Miami, FL

 

Best Student Broadcaster

Sam Brief, Highland Park High School, Highland Park, IL

 

Highlight of the Year

”Bishop Kenny #9 Charles Wade 80yd TD run,” Bishop Kenny High School, Jacksonville, FL

 

Omar Delgado, broadcast program leader at Christopher Columbus High School in Miami, FL and Teacher of the Year, said the first annual NFHS Network Broadcast Academy is like nothing his students have ever participated in.  “I’ve been to many broadcast and TV conferences and the truth of the matter is these sessions are unmatched.  Fun, interactive, hands on and enjoyable. “

 

Sam Brief, student at Highland Park High School in Highland Park, IL and winner of the NFHS Network’s Best Student Broadcaster Award, shared how the NFHS Network connects long distance family members and reaches beyond the school’s local area.  He explained, “This basketball season, our team had a lot of success and our coach’s parents live in Arizona.  Normally, there would be no way for them to see their son’s game.  Thanks to the NFHS Network, they were able to watch broadcasts of the games and sometimes we’d give them a shout out on the air!”

 

ABOUT THE NFHS NETWORK

 

The NFHS Network captures the passion, pride, and energy of the high school experience by delivering live high school sports and events to family members and fans whenever they want, wherever they are.

 

The NFHS Network celebrates and showcases the unique accomplishments of students, whether they are a student-athlete participating in the 27 different sports covered by the Network, or one of the student broadcasters from schools around the country that produce events through the School Broadcast Program.  The NFHS Network also features state playoff and championship events for the 40 state members of the NFHS Network. 

 

All NFHS Network events are available online at www.NFHSnetwork.com and is optimized to view on all devices and screen sizes.  Follow the NFHS Network on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram at @NFHSnetwork for the latest news and event information. 

 

The NFHS Network is a joint venture among the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS), its member state associations and PlayOn! Sports.  The NFHS is located in Indianapolis, Indiana and is the national leadership organization for high school sports and performing arts activities. PlayOn! Sports is based in Atlanta, Georgia and is the nation’s largest high school sports media company.

 

Media subscriptions to NFHS Network are available upon request.

 

Link to photos from NFHS Network Broadcast Academy: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/7wqdqly1lira8kn/AAD4yGPkmxIxd54E5jMRwU0qa?dl=0.


NFHS OFFERS NEW “AFTER-SCHOOL” EMERGENCY RESPONSE TRAINING PROGRAM FOR HIGH SCHOOLS “Anyone Can Save a Life” Teaches Teams to Respond to Sudden Cardiac Arrest and Other Major Medical Emergencies

INDIANAPOLIS, IN (July 15, 2015) – To address a potentially dangerous gap in medical- response planning for after-school practices and events, the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) announced recently at its 2015 Annual Summer Meeting in New Orleans that it is encouraging every high school in the country that does not have an existing emergency action plan in place to prepare its teams to utilize the Emergency Action Planning Program, “Anyone Can Save a Life.”

Developed in 2008 by the Minnesota State High School League and Medtronic Philanthropy, “Anyone Can Save a Life” is a first-of-its kind, emergency action planning and training program for after-school practices and events.  It is designed to provide a coordinated team response to every major medical emergency, including sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) – the leading cause of death of young athletes in the United States. 

“The reality is that every day we send thousands of students out to fields and gyms for practice and events where there is a lack of systemic support for emergencies,” said Jody Redman, associate director of the Minnesota State High School league (MSHSL) and co-developer of the program.  “One coach cannot provide a coordinated response alone.  This program empowers students to be a part of the response which increases the speed and effectiveness of response until emergency services can arrive.”

Originally created to respond to cardiac arrest, this third version of “Anyone Can Save A Life” covers all medical emergencies, providing a turnkey solution for every school wishing to implement an emergency action plan for after-school practices and events. 

“If you are prepared to respond to Sudden Cardiac Arrest, a deadly condition, you are better prepared to respond to every emergency,” said Bob Gardner, NFHS executive director.  “We are encouraging all athletic administrators, appropriate health-care professionals and coaches to take the time during their season to implement the plan.  It only takes a few minutes, and we have seen that these actions can save lives.”

After successful pilots in Minnesota, Arizona, New York and Washington, the NFHS Foundation provided funding to expand the scope of this program to distribute training guides nationally to its member state associations and their member schools.  “Anyone Can Save A Life” training materials are available at no cost at http://www.anyonecansavealife.org/

Using the program guide, coaches assign specific “emergency response” roles to students on every team at every level.  If a student suffers a serious injury, or life-threatening event, teammates immediately spring into action with the information they need to call 911,  assist with CPR and retrieve the automated external defibrillator. 

“This training will not only make our kids safer at school,” said Joan Mellor, Sr. Portfolio Lead at Medtronic Philanthropy and co-developer of the program, “it will provide them life-saving skills that will benefit the entire community.”


New NFHS Officers, Board Members Elected

INDIANAPOLIS, IN (July 13, 2015) — Tom Welter, executive director of the Oregon School Activities Association (OSAA), is the new president of the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) for 2015-16. Welter, the 56th president of the NFHS, began his one-year term July 3 following the NFHS Summer Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana.    

Gary Musselman, executive director of the Kansas State High School Activities Association (KSHSAA), was elected by the NFHS Board of Directors to the position of president-elect for the upcoming year.

In addition, the following individuals were approved by the NFHS National Council for four-year terms on the NFHS Board of Directors: Karissa Niehoff, Ed.D., executive director of the Connecticut Association of Schools-Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference (CAS-CIAC), Section 1; Ed Sheakley, executive director of the Oklahoma Secondary School Activities Association (OSSAA), Section 6; and Kevin Fitzgerald, Ed.D., superintendent of the Caesar Rodney School District in Wyoming, Delaware, at large, Sections 2 and 6. Another new member of the Board of Directors is Bart Thompson, who has succeeded Eddie Bonine as executive director of the Nevada Interscholastic Activities Association (NIAA) and as the Section 7 Board representative. Thompson’s term will end in 2018.

    Welter, a native of Oregon, joined the OSAA in 1995 as assistant executive director and was chosen executive director in 2001.

After graduating from Oregon State University in 1971, Welter taught in Whyalla, South Australia, for three years before returning to Oregon in 1974, where he began a 20-year term of service at Central Catholic High School in Portland. He began as a teacher and coach and was the school’s athletic director for 18 years and vice principal/dean of students for 15 years.

During his years at Central Catholic, Welter was president of the Oregon Athletic Directors Association (OADA) in 1990-91. In 2010, he received the OADA Lifetime Achievement Award, as well as the Oregon Athletic Coaches Distinguished Service Award. He also was honored by the National Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association (NIAAA) with the NIAAA State Award of Merit in 1993 and the NIAAA Distinguished Service Award in 1996. Welter was inducted into the Central Catholic High School Hall of Fame in 2005 and the OADA Hall of Fame in 2014.   

Among his previous service to the NFHS, Welter was a member of the Sanctioning Committee (1995-98), Football Rules Committee (1995-2004) and the Strategic Planning Committee (2008). He has made several presentations at the NFHS Summer Meeting, NFHS/NIAAA National Athletic Directors Conference and NFHS Legal Meeting.

    Musselman joined the KSHSAA staff in 1988 as assistant executive director, a position he held until being promoted to executive director in 1996. A graduate of Ness City (Kansas) High School, Musselman earned his bachelor’s degree in secondary education from Kansas State University in 1974 and his master’s in secondary school administration from Wichita State University in 1987.

Musselman began his teaching and coaching career in 1974 at Independence (Kansas) Junior High School. He then held teaching and coaching positions at Andover (Kansas) Junior-Senior High School, Beloit (Kansas) Junior-Senior High School and Halstead (Kansas) High School. Prior to joining the KSHSAA staff, Musselman was the principal at LaCrosse (Kansas) High School. 

In addition to his current service on the Board of Directors, Musselman has served on numerous NFHS committees, including the Football Rules Committee, the Citizenship/Equity Committee, the Marketing Committee and the Appeal Board. Musselman served three terms as chair of the NFHS TARGET Committee (1992-95), which was involved with drug education/prevention programs. He was a member of three different NFHS Strategic Planning Committees, and he has been involved with other national organizations, including the National Association of Secondary School Principals, the National Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association and United School Administrators of Kansas.

Last year, Musselman represented the NFHS Board of Directors on the NFHS Concussion Summit, which was appointed to develop recommendations for minimizing risk of concussion in sports and to develop best practices for schools and state high school associations. In June, Musselman completed six years of service on the Board of Directors of the NFHS Foundation. Musselman was elected chairman during the 2014-15 term and led a major reorganization and expansion of the Foundation Board and its governance structure.

   
    Niehoff was named deputy executive director of CAS-CIAC in July 2010 and assumed the executive director’s position in January 2011. She began her career in Connecticut public education in 1989 as a physical education instructor at Greenwich High School. In the succeeding years, she was a teacher, coach, athletic director, assistant principal and principal at the middle school and high school levels.  

Niehoff was a highly successful field hockey coach at Litchfield High School and Joel Barlow High School with four conference titles and one state championship. She has served on the United States Field Hockey Association Board of Ethics since 1996. Niehoff also coached high school volleyball, softball, basketball and track. In 2000, Niehoff was appointed assistant principal of Har-Bur Middle School in Burlington. Four years later, she assumed the position of principal of Lewis Mills High School, a post she held until joining the Connecticut association.

Niehoff served on the Education Committee of the United States Olympic Committee, authoring the “OlympiKids School Celebration Guide,” acting as U.S. delegate to International Olympic Academies in Greece and Canada, and representing the USOC at numerous national conventions, conferences and educational programs. She was co-founder and dean of the “Passing The Torch” Academy For Youth Sport Leadership, a USOC initiative to promote leadership and the spirit of Olympism within the realm of youth sport.

Prior to joining the Connecticut association, Niehoff served on numerous CAS and CIAC boards and committees, including the Field Hockey Committee, CIAC Board of Control and chair of the Sportsmanship Committee.


    Sheakley became executive director of the Oklahoma association in May 2009 after serving as interim executive director for one month. He was an assistant director with the OSSAA for 17 years before accepting his new position. During his tenure as assistant director, Sheakley was responsible for wrestling, slow-pitch softball, volleyball and academic bowl.

Before joining the OSSAA in 1992, Sheakley served as an administrator, educator and coach in Oklahoma’s Blackwell, Madill and Clinton school districts, including the roles of assistant principal and athletic director at Blackwell High School. Before moving to Oklahoma in 1982, Sheakley taught and coached in his home state of Iowa.

Among his previous involvement at the national level, Sheakley is a former member of the NFHS Equity Committee and NFHS Appeal Board.

Fitzgerald has been superintendent of the Caesar Rodney School District since 2007 after seven years as assistant principal and nine years as principal at Caesar Rodney High School. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Frostburg State University (Maryland), his master’s from St. John’s College (Maryland) and his doctorate from the University of Delaware.


    Fitzgerald began his career in education in Maryland in 1978 as a social studies and English teacher. He also coached football, basketball and baseball, and was a high school athletic director and basketball official.

In 2002, Fitzgerald was recognized as Delaware’s Secondary Principal of the Year, and in 2013 he was selected as Delaware’s Superintendent of the Year. He is a former president of the Delaware Chief School Officers Association and chairman of the Delaware Interscholastic Athletic Association.

Thompson, who joined the NIAA as executive director effective July 1, has served as assistant director of the Utah High School Activities Association (UHSAA) for the past eight years.


    Thompson’s responsibilities at the UHSAA included soccer, cross county, track, wrestling, and speech and debate. He also handled the association’s legislative issues and was the coordinator of sports medicine.

Prior to joining the UHSAA staff in the summer of 2007, Thompson coached football, wrestling and track for 22 years at Viewmont High School in Bountiful, Utah, after beginning his career in education as a teacher and coach at Clearfield (Utah) High School.

Thompson previously served on the NFHS Wrestling Rules Committee, Sports Medicine Advisory Committee and Speech Committee.


AHSAA Assistant Director Wanda Gilliland Receives NFHS Citation at 96th Summer Meeting at New Orleans

     INDIANAPOLIS, IN (July 1, 2015) — Wanda Gilliland, assistant director of the Alabama High School Athletic Association, is among 12 leaders in high school activity programs across the country selected to receive National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) Citations.

      She received the award at a special luncheon held at the 2015 the 96th annual NFHS Summer Meeting in New Orleans Wednesday.  An award designed to honor individuals who have made contributions to the NFHS, state high school associations, athletic director and coaching professions, the officiating avocation and fine arts/performing arts programs, the NFHS Citation is one of the most highly regarded achievements in high school athletics and performing arts.

      “I know of no one who is more deserving than Wanda Gilliland,” AHSAA Executive Director Steve Savarese said. “She is dedicated, loyal and a tireless servant who loves the AHSAA and its mission. We are very proud of her and are elated she is being recognized by the NFHS for her many contributions.”
      Ms. Gilliland has been an assistant director with the AHSAA since 1996. A graduate of Marion County High School and Athens State College, she served as a teacher and coach/athletic director at Hamilton High School from 1979-1996 where her girls’ basketball teams compiled a 301-96 record, won a state championship in 1990, finished runner-up the next year and won the Marion County tournament seven times.
       She has played a key role in the development of state championship programs in volleyball, softball, basketball and cross country. She has helped govern eligibility requirements through involvement with school audits, investigations and foreign exchange student regulations.
      Gilliland has received several coach-of-the-year honors and has served on the NFHS basketball, softball and spirit rules committees. She currently chairs the NFHS Softball Rules Committee. She was inducted into AHSAA Sports Hall of Fame in 2011 and the Marion County Sports Hall of Fame in 2001.
       Gilliland, the Section 3 recipient, becomes the sixth Alabama recipient of the prestigious NFHS Citation Award since its inception in 1987. Past recipients include Ken Blankenship (Coaches Citation) in 2000, Greg Brewer (Section 3) in 2006, Houston Young (Officials Citation), 2010, Alan Mitchell (Section 3) in 2012, and Jeff Hilyer (Officials Citation) in 2014.
      E
ight Citation honorees, one from each of the NFHS member-school districts, are recognized annually as well as four other Citation recipients representing NFHS professional organizations for officials, coaches, music leaders and speech/debate/theatre directors.
        The other state association recipients for 2015 were Pat Corbin, Section 1, retired executive director of the New Hampshire Interscholastic Athletic Association; Butch Powell, Section 2, assistant executive director of the West Virginia Secondary School Activities Commission; Scott Johnson, Section 4, assistant executive director of the Illinois High School Association; Cheryl Gleason, Section 5, assistant executive director of the Kansas State High School Activities Association; Amy Cassell, Section 6, assistant director of the Oklahoma Secondary School Activities Association; Dwight Toyama, Section 7, former executive director of the Hawaii High School Athletic Association and the Oahu Interscholastic Association; and John Billetz, Section 8, retired executive director of the Idaho High School Activities Association.
        Other Citation recipients at Wednesday’s awards luncheon were James Coon, Officials  Citation recipient, volleyball official, Pittsboro, Indiana; Milt Bassett, Coach Citation recipient, executive director, Oklahoma Coaches Association, Edmond, Oklahoma; Jean Ney, Music Citation recipient, retired coordinator of fine arts, Kansas City, Kansas, Public Schools, Bonner Springs, Kansas; and Darrel Harbaugh, Speech/Debate/Theatre Citation recipient, retired director of debate and forensics, Field Kindley Memorial High School, Coffeyville, Kansas.
        Missouri State High School Activities Association legal counsel Mallory Mayse was also presented the NFHS Award of Merit for his contributions over the last 40 years to the NFHS and MSHSAA concerning legal issues.   The award, while not presented annually, has recognized 42 individuals since 1966 including former President Gerald Ford (1983) and former AHSAA Executive Director Herman L. “Bubba” Scott (1992).
         The NFHS American Tradition Award was also presented to Varsity Spirit, a company dedicated to spirit and cheer participation.  Varsity Spirit became just the eighth recipient of the award since 1985.


NFHS, Simon’s Fund release “Sudden Cardiac Arrest” on www.nfhslearn.com

INDIANAPOLIS, IN (June 24, 2015) – The National Federation of State High School Associations has added a new course to its selection of online education courses available through the NFHS Learning Center at www.nfhslearn.com.

            “Sudden Cardiac Arrest” was developed in conjunction with Simon’s Fund, which raises awareness about the conditions that lead to sudden cardiac arrest and death in young athletes.

             “The NFHS is pleased to partner with Simon's Fund to provide this free online course,” said Dan Schuster, director of coach education at NFHS. “This is critically important information that can save a life and ultimately create a safer environment for students.” 

The course educates coaches, students, parents and others about sudden cardiac arrest, how to recognize its warning signs and symptoms, and the appropriate course of action to be taken if a player collapses during physical activity.

            Sudden cardiac arrest is the No. 1 cause of death in the United States for student-athletes during exercise, taking the lives of thousands every year.

“It is critically important for coaches – and others – to be able to recognize the signs and symptoms of sudden cardiac arrest, and to know how to respond effectively in order to protect student-athletes,” said Dr. Bill Heinz, chair of the NFHS Sports Medicine Advisory Committee and host of the new “Sudden Cardiac Arrest” course.

            “By partnering with the NFHS, hundreds of thousands of coaches will see our educational video and become educated about the warning signs and conditions that lead to sudden cardiac arrest.  We can’t think of a better way of fulfilling our mission,” said Darren Sudman, executive director and co-founder of Simon’s Fund.

            Along with this new course, the NFHS also encourages all schools to develop and implement an emergency action plan, have an AED on site and have an appropriate health-care professional present at as many events as possible in order to minimize risk to student-athletes.

            “Sudden Cardiac Arrest” takes just 15 minutes to complete and can be used toward fulfillment of Certified Interscholastic Coach requirements, part of the NFHS National Certification Program.

The course can be taken for free at https://nfhslearn.com/courses/61032.


Jackie Stiles, J. T. Curtis Among 12 Individuals Selected for 2015 Class of National High School Hall of Fame

     INDIANAPOLIS, IN (June 23, 2015) — Jackie Stiles, the high school basketball legend from Claflin, Kansas, who is the leading scorer in NCAA women’s basketball history, and J. T. Curtis, whose 542 victories as football coach at John Curtis Christian School in Louisiana rank No. 2 all-time, are among 12 individuals selected for the 2015 class of the National High School Hall of Fame.

Other athletes who were chosen for this year’s class are Cindy Brogdon, who helped Greater Atlanta Christian School to three state girls basketball titles in the early 1970s while setting 12 school records; Nikki McCray-Penson, Tennessee’s all-time leading scorer in five-player girls basketball during her days at Collierville High School; and Lincoln McIlravy, who won five South Dakota state wrestling titles at Philip High School and three NCAA championships at the University of Iowa.

Joining Curtis as coaches in this year’s class are David Barney, who has won 34 state championships in boys and girls swimming at Albuquerque Academy in New Mexico; Rick Lorenz, girls volleyball coach at Central Catholic High School in Portland, Oregon, who has won 10 state championships and 1,174 matches; Don Petranovich, who retired in 2010 after winning eight girls basketball state championships at Winslow High School in Arizona; and Charles “Corky” Rogers, football coach at The Bolles School in Jacksonville, Florida, who ranks fifth among active coaches with 444 victories.

These four athletes and five coaches, along with one contest official, one state association administrator and one in the performing arts, will be inducted into the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) National High School Hall of Fame July 2 at the New Orleans Marriott in New Orleans, Louisiana. The 33rd Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony will be the closing event of the 96th annual NFHS Summer Meeting.

Other members of the 2015 induction class are the late Joseph (Joe) Pangrazio Sr., who was a football official for 45 years and a basketball official for 55 years with the Ohio High School Athletic Association; Doug Chickering, who guided the Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association to unprecedented levels of success during his 24 years (1986-2009) as executive director; and Mike Burton, one of the nation’s top speech and debate coaches during his 39 years (1969-2008) at two schools in the state of Washington.

            The National High School Hall of Fame was started in 1982 by the NFHS to honor high school athletes, coaches, contest officials, administrators, performing arts coaches/directors and others for their extraordinary achievements and accomplishments in high school sports and activity programs. This year’s class increases the number of individuals in the Hall of Fame to 435.

            The 12 individuals were chosen after a two-level selection process involving a screening committee composed of active high school state association administrators, coaches and officials, and a final selection committee composed of coaches, former athletes, state association officials, media representatives and educational leaders. Nominations were made through NFHS member associations.

            Following is biographical information on the 12 individuals in the 2015 class of the National High School Hall of Fame.

 

 

 

 

ATHLETES

                Cindy Brogdon was one of the top girls basketball players in Georgia history during her four years (1972-75) at Greater Atlanta Christian School in Norcross. She led her teams to three state titles (finished second the other year) and set 12 school records, including most points in a game (44) and highest career scoring average (23.7). Brogdon played two years at Mercer University, averaging 30.1 points per game, and two years at the University of Tennessee, where she led the Lady Vols in scoring both seasons. Brogdon was a member of the 1976 U.S. Olympic women’s basketball team and was inducted into the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame and the Women’s College Basketball Hall of Fame in 2002. She is currently a teacher and coach at Northview High School in Johns Creek, Georgia.

            Nikki McCray-Penson scored 3,594 points during her four-year basketball career at Collierville (Tennessee) High School – most in state history for the five-player game. She led her team to the state tournament as a senior in 1990 and was the state’s top scorer with an average of 33.6 points per game. McCray also is the state’s all-time leading rebounder and was  named Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association Class AAA Miss Basketball in 1990. McCray led the University of Tennessee to a 122-11 record during her four years and was Southeastern Conference Player of the Year as a junior and senior. She played on two Olympic gold medal teams (1996, 2000) and played nine years in the Women’s National Basketball Association. McCray was inducted into the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame in 2012. She is currently an assistant women’s basketball coach at the University of South Carolina. 

            Lincoln McIlravy won five state wrestling titles (1988-92) at Philip High School in South Dakota – the first as an eighth-grader in the 98-pound class. He also won the 112-pound title as a ninth-grader, the 125-pound championship as a sophomore and the 152-pound titles as a junior and senior. His overall high school record was 200-25. At the University of Iowa, McIlravy posted an overall record of 96-3-12 and won three NCAA championships and three Big Ten Conference titles. From 1997 to 2000, McIlravy won four consecutive USA national freestyle titles. He also claimed three World Team trials and the 2000 USA Olympic trials. McIlravy was a bronze medalist at the 2000 Olympic Games. In 2010, McIlravy became a “distinguished member” of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame.

            Jackie Stiles is regarded by most people as the greatest female athlete in Kansas history after her incredible accomplishments at Claflin High School from 1993 to 1997. In basketball, she scored 3,603 points and averaged 35.7 points per game (seventh all-time nationally), which includes a staggering 46.4 scoring average (fourth all-time nationally) as a senior. She set the state’s all-time single-game mark with 71 points in 1997. In track and field, Stiles helped Claflin to two state titles and set an all-state record with 14 gold medals and two silver medals (16 possible medals). She won four gold medals as a freshman and, as a junior, became the first female athlete to win the 400, 800, 1600 and 3200 – all in one day. She also competed on the cross country and tennis teams. Stiles’ accomplishments continued at Southwest Missouri State University (now Missouri State University), where she led her team to a berth in the Women’s Final Four in 2001. Stiles is the all-time leading scorer in NCAA Division I women’s basketball history with 3,393 points and led the NCAA in scoring in 1999-2000 with a 27.8 per-game average. She is the school’s single-season scoring leader. Stiles was named WNBA Rookie of the Year in 2001 after averaging 14.9 points per game for the Portland Fire. She currently is assistant women’s basketball coach at Missouri State University.

COACHES

            David Barney has been involved in interscholastic coaching since 1961, including the past 40 years as girls swimming coach and the past 33 years as boys swimming coach at Albuquerque Academy (AA) in New Mexico. The amazing 83-year-old Barney has led his AA swimmers to 34 New Mexico Activities Association state titles (18 boys, 16 girls). His overall record (boys and girls) entering the 2014-15 season was 923-71. Barney’s teams previously set or still hold 70 state records with 238 individuals and relays winning gold medals. Barney has coached five National Interscholastic Swim Coaches Association (NISCA) national champions and he has coached more than 300 NISCA All-American swimmers. In 1995, Barney was selected the first NFHS National High School Girls Swimming Coach of the Year. In 2010, he was the first swimming coach to be inducted into the NMAA’s Hall of Pride & Honor.

            J. T. Curtis has registered a phenomenal 542-58-6 record (89.9 winning percentage) during his 46 years as football coach at John Curtis Christian School in River Ridge, Louisiana. He is second all-time in coaching victories, trailing the legendary John McKissick, who has 621 wins through the 2014 season. Curtis has led his teams to 26 state championships in 35 appearances in the Louisiana High School Athletic Association (LHSAA) state title game, and the school has reached the championship game for 19 consecutive years. In 2012, his team was the consensus national champion and he was named USA Today Coach of the Year for the second time. Curtis is also the school’s athletic director, overseeing a program that has won more than 50 state championships in eight different sports, and the school’s headmaster. An ordained minister, Curtis delivers weekly sermons to a local congregation.

            Rick Lorenz has coached girls volleyball in Oregon since 1976, including the past 27 years at Central Catholic High School in Portland. He previously coached 10 years at St. Mary’s Academy and one year at Lake Oswego High School. Lorenz has led his teams to 10 Oregon School Activities Association state championships and 10 second-place finishes. His teams have advanced to the finals site in 32 of his 39 years coaching the sport. Lorenz has posted a 1,174-185 record (86.3 winning percentage) and his career victory total ranks eighth all-time nationally according to the NFHS’ National High School Sports Record Book. Lorenz’s 2011 team registered a perfect 44-0 record in the state’s largest volleyball class and won a third consecutive state title. Last year, Lorenz was named National Volleyball Coach of the Year by the National High School Coaches Association (NHSCA).

            Don Petranovich retired in 2010 after a legendary 33-year career as girls basketball coach at Winslow (Arizona) High School. Petranovich registered a state-record 780-158 record (83.1 winning percentage) and appeared in a state-record 16 state championship games, winning the title eight times. His 1989 and 1990 teams won a state-record 44 consecutive games. Petranovich was NFHS National Girls Basketball Coach of the Year in 2009 and was named the Arizona Interscholastic Association’s Coach of the 20th Century. He played major roles in the early development of girls high school basketball in Arizona as well as the rise in interest in girls basketball on Native American reservations. Petranovich also served as the school’s athletic director for 28 years, retiring in 2013.

            Charles “Corky” Rogers ranks sixth all-time (fifth among active coaches) in career football coaching victories during his outstanding 43-year career at two Jacksonville, Florida, high schools. Rogers coached at his alma mater, Robert E. Lee High School, from 1972 to 1988, and has directed the football program at The Bolles School for the past 26 years. Rogers has compiled an overall 444-80-1 record (84.8 winning percentage) and was the eighth coach in high school football history to surpass 400 victories. Rogers’ teams have won 11 Florida High School Athletic Association state championships in 16 appearances – most in Florida history. He has been inducted in several halls of fame and was National High School Football Coach of the Year in 2004-05, as selected by the National High School Coaches Association.

OFFICIAL

            The late Joseph (Joe) Pangrazio Sr. was an Ohio High School Athletic Association (OHSAA) football official for 45 years (1955-2000) and an OHSAA basketball official for 55 years (1945-2000). He officiated six state football championships and 10 state basketball tournaments (eight boys, two girls). He conducted countless clinics and camps and was instrumental in recruiting and mentoring numerous new football and basketball officials. Pangrazio was also a highly successful college basketball official in several conferences and was a Big Ten Conference basketball officials observer and evaluator at Ohio State University for 25 years. Pangrazio was a 1989 charter member of the OHSAA Officials Hall of Fame, and last year he was inducted into the Ohio Basketball Hall of Fame.

ADMINISTRATOR

            Doug Chickering guided the Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association (WIAA) to unprecedented success during his 24 years (1986-2009) as executive director. Only the fourth person to hold the position in the 113-year history of the WIAA, Chickering was instrumental in adding private schools into the association in 2000, expanding state tournament opportunities in all sports, and enhancing the exposure of high school sports through various media platforms. At the national level, Chickering served two terms on the NFHS Board of Directors and was president in 1992-93. During his year as president, Chickering guided the organization through some challenging financial times, and he later was instrumental in establishing the NFHS Foundation. He was chair of the Foundation Board of Directors until his retirement in 2009. Chickering also chaired the NFHS Strategic Planning Committee. Prior to joining the WIAA in 1986, Chickering was a teacher, coach, athletic director, principal and district administrator in the Gilman and Marathon schools in Wisconsin.

PERFORMING ARTS

            Mike Burton retired in 2008 after an outstanding 39-year career as a speech and debate coach in the state of Washington. Burton started his career in 1969 at White River High School in Buckley, Washington, and then served for 25 years in the Auburn, Washington, School District. He closed his career with a nine-year stint at Eastside Catholic High School in Bellevue, where he started the speech and debate program in 2000. Burton’s students won three national championships and 36 state championships. He was known for building the Auburn forensics program into one of the largest and most successful in the nation, with 120 to 150 students involved. He served on the Washington Interscholastic Activities Association (WIAA) Forensics Committee for 14 years and was the National Catholic Forensic League diocese director. Burton also coached baseball for 15 years and was a highly successful high school and college football official for 36 years. Burton was president of the NFHS Officials Association in 1998.


AHSAA mourns death of Collinsville coach

     The AHSAA is saddened to learn of the death of Coach L.D. Dobbins. The long-time Collinsville High School basketball coach passed away June 11.  He is survived by his wife Marian.
      Coach Dobbins, who coached at Collinsville for 29 years, retired in 1991 with a 511-311 record with one state championship in 1975. Always promoting sportsmanship, he was cited for only four technical fouls in his coaching career.
    Coach Dobbins was inducted into the AHSAA Sports Hall of Fame in 2000. He was inducted as a charter member into the DeKalb County Sports Hall of Fame. The gymnasium at Collinsville High School is also named in his honor.


Ohio University is new NFHS Corporate Partner

INDIANAPOLIS, IN (June 12, 2015) – Ohio University, the nation’s ninth oldest public university and a pioneer in sports education, has entered into a one-year agreement with the National Federation of State High School Associations as an NFHS Corporate Partner.

As part of the agreement, Ohio University, located in Athens, Ohio, will be considered one of three exclusive NFHS Partners for the NFHS Coach Education Program, and the only Educational Academic Program Partner of the NFHS.

“We are pleased to enter this agreement with Ohio University, a long-time leader in sports administration programs,” said Bob Gardner, NFHS executive director. “These master’s programs provide an excellent opportunity for coaches and athletic administrators to advance their careers.”

Recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of America’s best universities, Ohio University offers two distinct graduate programs for athletic leaders: the Online Master’s in Athletic Administration (MAA) and the Online Master’s in Coaching Education (MCE).

Designed exclusively for busy professionals, coursework for the MAA and MCE programs is delivered 100 percent online. The innovative online format gives coaches and athletic administrators the flexibility needed to advance their education without having to put their career on hold.

                We have a strong appreciation for the NFHS and consider it an honor to be named a corporate partner,” said Dr. Scott Smith, program director for Ohio University’s online MAA program. “To strategically align ourselves with such a tremendous brand and education-based leader in interscholastic sports will only heighten our ability to support the growth of today’s best coaches and athletic directors. 

As the first specialized academic sports program in the country, Ohio University’s online Master’s in Athletic Administration is focused solely on developing interscholastic athletic directors and preparing them for National Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association (NIAAA) Certification. To learn more about Ohio University’s online MAA program, visit: http://athleticadminonline.ohio.edu/

The online MCE program prepares coaches to excel at all levels of competition through a challenging curriculum based on the National Association of Sport and Physical Education’s (NASPE) “8 Domains of Coaching.”  For more information regarding the online MCE program, visit: http://mastersincoachingonline.ohio.edu/.

Applications for both programs are currently being accepted for the Fall 2015 term. No GRE or GMAT is required to apply. Both programs can be completed in two years.


Public-Address Announcers to be Recognized During National High School Activities Month

INDIANAPOLIS, IN (May 20, 2015) – For the first time, public-address announcers will be recognized and celebrated during “National High School Activities Month” sponsored by the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) this October. During the October 1-10 timeframe, a focus on what public-address announcers bring to the high school activities experience will be included with sportsmanship and fan appreciation.

“Public-address announcers have a lot of control, and really set the stage for fans and participants to enjoy the athletic experience,” said Elliot Hopkins, director of sports and student services at the NFHS. “Therefore, we thought it was important to include public-address announcers and celebrate their importance in high schools across America during Activities Month.”

The NFHS initially created National High School Activities Week in 1980 to increase the public’s awareness of the values and benefits inherent in high school athletics and other co-curricular activities. Activities Week has since expanded into Activities Month, with each week designed to promote and celebrate different areas of high school activities. The first week of Activities Month will now be called National Sportsmanship, Fan Appreciation and Public-Address Announcers Week.   

In addition to promoting the values of sportsmanship and acknowledging those faithful fans of high school sports, schools are now encouraged to acknowledge the dedication and service that public-address announcers provide at every athletic contest.

The addition of public-address announcers to Activities Month was due, in part, to the focus being directed to these individuals by the National Association for Sports Public Address Announcers (NASPAA). NASPAA was founded several years ago by Brad Rumble, former assistant director of the NFHS.

“Besides the fact that [announcers] enjoy what they do, the primary reason they announce is to give back to the athletes, school and community,” Rumble said.  “Because of public-address announcers who know their role and follow approved public-address announcing guidelines, games and events are significantly enhanced. For these reasons and for their decades of service to high school sports, the NASPAA is proud to partner with the NFHS to make it possible for the men, women and student public-address announcers to be recognized by being included in National High School Activities Month."